What to do with that leftover Cantonese Roast Duck?

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I know, I know, it’s a very specific problem to deal with.

But I couldn’t think of any way to write this post.

Do you have Cantonese roast duck leftover from your previous night of Chinese banqueting? And it just so happens that you have every single ingredient listed below?  If so, try my recipe.

I’m happy to make things so simple for you guys :)

Of course, if you don’t have extra Cantonese Roast duck laying around, you can use leftover Peking duck instead.

Kidding! Just use any meat you wish, or go without meat.

My favorite way of eating Yi Mein (longevity noodles) is with sliced shiitake mushrooms. I’m a hypocrite for this post because I wanted to use up the duck, alright?

 

Yi Mein (Longevity Noodles) with Roast Duck, Chives and Shiitake Mushrooms, Serves 4-6

Ingredients:

  • 8 oz. longevity noodles, boiled for 5 minutes then drained
  • leftover duck, sliced diagonal with bones removed
  • 1 cup chives (chinese chives or regular chives)
  • 1-2 cups shiitake mushrooms, sliced
  • 2 tbsp. oil

For Sauce:

  • 5 cups chicken broth
  • 4 tbsp. soy sauce
  • 4 tbsp. oyster sauce
  • 1 tbsp. sugar

For thickening the sauce:

  • 2 tbsp. water
  • 1 tbsp. cornstarch

Directions:

1) Cook the longevity noodles in boiling water for 5 minutes. Drain, and set aside.

2) Chop leftover duck diagonally, with the bones removed. Roughly chop the chives. Slice shiitake mushrooms.

3)  In a bowl, mix together ingredients for a sauce. In a separate small bowl, mix together ingredients for the thickening agent.

4)  In a wok on medium high, add oil. After oil heats up, add drained noodles, duck, chives and mushrooms. Stir-fry for 5 minutes.

5)  Pour in bowl of sauce, coating the noodles thoroughly. Add thickening agent, stirring to thicken the sauce. Take off heat and serve.

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Illustrated Directions:

This is the brand of Longevity noodles I buy at the local Asian market. Longevity noodles are long noodles that aren’t supposed to be cut, for good luck, and symbolize long life. It’s usually eaten for birthdays.

Of course, I only wanted Kentucky Fried Chicken and Pizza for my birthday when I was little.

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I’m making up for all those birthdays by eating this much, much more now since I’m older.

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Boil noodles for 5 minutes, then set aside to drain.

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Chop chives, mushrooms and duck.

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Picture me making the sauce in a bowl. I forgot to take a picture.

Now picture me making the thickening agent.

Ok let’s move on…

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Add 2 tsp. oil into a wok heated on medium high heat. Add noodles, chives, duck and mushrooms. Stir-fry for 5 minutes.

I always use tongs because my wok is so small that using a spatula is really difficult.

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Add sauce, stirring to coat the noodles thoroughly. Then add thickening agent, stirring until sauce is thickened.

Pour noodles into large dish/bowl and serve.

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Enjoy!!!

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3 Thoughts on “What to do with that leftover Cantonese Roast Duck?

  1. This is a great way to deal with roast duck leftover, thanks for sharing!

  2. Thanks Kenny! It’s great to know someone has the exact same leftover roast duck problem as I do sometimes! :P

  3. Mimmie on July 11, 2009 at 12:34 pm said:

    Thanks for this post and recipe! I just had leftover peking duck the night before and followed your recipe to make noodles just like my parents used to make for me growing up! I love your step by step pictures and the fact you even show which brand to buy! Really helps out when I’m in the Chinese grocery store without my parents.

    Hope you have a lovely day! Keep up the great blogging/cooking/picture-taking! :)

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