Chinese Snow Ear Soup

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Snow Ear Soup, White Fungus Soup, Silver Ear Soup, White Wood Ear Soup, it goes by a variation of names. But there are no ears in this soup, nor any silver, wood or snow.

There are an endless amount of Chinese soups that are made with a light, simple broth, and most likely eaten with daily meals. Most of the ingredients have medicinal purposes, or help combat ‘yeet hay’. ‘Yeet Hay’ translates literally to ‘Hot Air’. This is incredibly hard to explain to non-speaking Cantonese people, because I swear this condition only exists with Cantonese people. Let me try to explain it the best I can. You can develop ‘yeet hay’ when you eat too many certain foods, like greasy foods, such as fried chicken, pizza, potato chips. After eating an excess of a greasy food, your breath becomes uncomfortably hot, like you’re developing the beginning stages of a sore throat, or even an actual sore throat. Sometimes, you might develop a canker sore, or in severe cases, a nosebleed. That’s because the balance of your ‘cool and ‘hot’ in your body has been affected. Fortunately, there are a number of soups that help counteract this ‘yeet hay’ to balance out your system.

Of course, hot foods aren’t the only culprit in giving you ‘hot air’. Fruits such as lychee, melon, or for me, strawberries can cause yeet hay. Eating too much of these fruits sometimes causes a mild allergic reaction. This is why most Cantonese people drink soup with every meal, so it helps balance out the other foods around them.

If you still don’t buy into all this, I’m not going to try to convince you. It’s hard enough to explain to my husband (a Caucasian). But think of it this way: when you’re sick, all you want is a bowl of warm chicken soup. Now think of how soothing it would be to have a bowl of soup with every meal for preventative purposes. Sometimes too much of a good thing (like fried chicken) is never good for you. So moderation and prevention is best.

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3 of the ingredients in this soup are shiitake mushrooms, dried red dates, and white fungus. You can buy them in most Asian grocery stores, dehydrated in bags like these. They are relatively cheap.

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White fungus is a type of mushroom that is mild in flavor with a unique, jelly-like texture. It has a cooling effect when eaten in the soup, and carries medicinal properties as well.

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Dried red dates are also used in many Chinese soups. They give the soup a sweet flavor.

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And everyone knows what shiitake mushrooms are.

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Snow Ear Soup (makes 8-10 cups)

Ingredients:

  • 1-2 pieces of snow ear fungus
  • 4-5 shiitake mushrooms
  • 10 dried red dates
  • 1/2 – 3/4 lb. pork shoulder (pork butt), cut into cubes
  • 10 cups water
  • salt

Directions:

1) In a large pot, combine water, pork shoulder and dates. Bring to a boil, then cover with lid and lower the heat to low-medium low.

2) Soak the shiitake mushrooms and snow ear fungus in a bowl of water for 20 minutes or until reconstituted with water. Cut the stems off the shiitake and snow ear, and chop the snow ear into bite sized pieces. Add into the pot of soup and simmer for at least an hour and a half. After you are done simmering, salt to taste, adding half a teaspoon and tasting until you are satisfied with the flavor. Serve hot. Leftovers can be stored in tupperware for up to 3 days.

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DSC_0030 Just a picture of the pork shoulder and dates. I never eat the pork or dates in the soup, I just like how they flavor the broth. You can also use chicken if you don’t prefer pork.

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8 Thoughts on “Chinese Snow Ear Soup

  1. Angela on April 1, 2010 at 8:40 pm said:

    Indians know what “yeet hay” is too. We asked an Indian coworker how they handle eating so many mangoes during mango season without getting yeet hay. (They soak the mangoes in tubs of cold water for a long time.)

  2. It’s funny that you posted about an Asian soup and the importance of eating soup everyday. This morning I woke up craving Asian soup like crazy!

  3. I love soup. Your soup looks beautiful. Great photo!

  4. this is an absolutely beautiful post. beautiful pictures. beautiful writing.

  5. Angela – I’m glad to know that it does exist in other cultures. Sometimes it drives me crazy when my husband looks at me crazy when I say he might get ‘yeet hay’ after eating too many chips. Thanks for the mango tip – they are my favorite fruit and I can’t seem to get around the problem of eating them yet so I’ll try that now.

    Chiara – You should try it out. Most asian grocery stores would have all the dehydrated ingredients….

    Hummingbird – Thank you :)

    Lissa – Thanks!

  6. Robin on August 8, 2011 at 6:17 pm said:

    My parents make this soup but with sliced ginger and chicken – have you tried it that way? I loved your explanation of “yeet hay” and I had to send it to my friends because you are MUCH better than me at explaining what it means. I get “yeet hay” with longans and fried foods (of course). Oolong tea does the trick for me if I don’t have time to make/buy soup but what would I do to have this soup 5x a week!

  7. Robin on August 8, 2011 at 6:17 pm said:

    My parents make this soup but with sliced ginger and chicken – have you tried it that way? I loved your explanation of “yeet hay” and I had to send it to my friends because you are MUCH better than me at explaining what it means. I get “yeet hay” with longans and fried foods (of course). Oolong tea does the trick for me if I don’t have time to make/buy soup but what I would do to have this soup 5x a week!

  8. Robin on August 8, 2011 at 6:19 pm said:

    My parents make this soup but with sliced ginger and chicken – have you tried it that way? I loved your explanation of “yeet hay” and I had to send it to my friends because you are MUCH better than me at explaining what it means. I get “yeet hay” with longans and fried foods (of course). Oolong tea does the trick for me if I don’t have time to make/buy soup but I would give anything to have this soup and many other Cantonese soups every day!

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