Potato and Cheese Pierogies

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My husband, with a mouthful of potatoey goodness: “That’s a damn good pierogi!”

First off, if anyone has an issue with my spelling of pierogi/pierogies, you’re always welcome to read the dictionary or encyclopedia for your entertainment instead. This post is about making delicious dumplings filled with cheesy potatoes topped with buttery sautéed onions and served with fresh dollops of sour cream. And I’ll continue to use the words pierogi or pierogies when I’m identifying said dumpling. Maybe I’ll throw in a ‘perogy’ just for giggles, who knows.

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That said, I’ve been asked to make pierogies on my site for the past month by a friend who wanted visuals along with a recipe. I’ve only made pierogies once before, and that was about 7 years ago. I only remember because it was so easy to whip up the homemade dough and potato mixture. It only takes a few ingredients for each, and you can choose to make it as complicated as you like (adding cheese, onions, garlic, chives, etc. to the potato filling). My pierogies have a potato and cheese mixture with a bit of dried chives. Some of you might want to add onions to the mixture rather than cheese, and if you do, sauté them before adding them to the potatoes. Same with the garlic.

I used sharp cheddar cheese in my filling because it’s one of the more pungent cheeses that packs the most flavor. I also know I used enough cheese when the potatoes turned orange. I also kept feeling the need to add butter and milk to my potatoes, but I had to remind myself I wasn’t making mashed potatoes. Taste the filling to make sure you’ve added enough salt and pepper, a good 6, 7, 10 mouthfuls will do. I added a little more s/p in the filling than I do with mashed potatoes, because it is a filling, so it needs to be handled like so.

Cheese and Potato Pierogies (makes 24)

Dough Ingredients:

  • 2 1/4 cups flour
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/3 cup water

Potato & Cheese Filling:

  • 1 lb. russet potatoes
  • 3 oz. grated cheddar cheese
  • salt/pepper
  • 1 Tbsp. dried chives

Other Ingredients:

  • 1 onion, sliced thinly
  • butter (for sautéing)
  • flour (kneading and rolling dough)

Directions:

1) To make the dough: Combine flour and salt. Add beaten eggs and water. Mix the dough until it becomes elastic and can be molded into a ball. Add more flour if it is too sticky. Wrap ball of dough in plastic and set in refrigerator for at least 30 minutes.

2) To make the filling: Cut potatoes into cubes. Boil until soft. Mash with grated cheese, chives. Salt and pepper to taste. Let cool to room temperature.

3) To fill pierogies: Generously flour a cutting board and form the dough into a long roll. Add flour to the board and your hands as needed. Form 24 balls of dough from roll. Flatten a dough ball with your hand and make it large enough to place a heaping teaspoon (or more) or potato filling in center. Fold dumpling in half, and seal edges by crimping the sides together with a fork. Set on a floured surface and repeat until finished.

4) Melt 1 Tbsp. of butter on a large skillet. Sauté onions until browned, set aside.

5) To cook pierogies: Boil a large pot of salted water. On another burner, add 1 tsp. of butter on a skillet and heat on medium high heat. Add pierogies to the boiled water, 4-5 at a time but don’t overcrowd the pot. Boil for a few minutes until they float up, use a slotted spoon to lift them out onto a plate. Place drained pierogies onto the skillet and cook both sides until golden. Set on a plate and repeat process until finished. Top pierogies with sautéed onions and serve with sour cream.

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To make the dough: Combine flour and salt. Add beaten eggs and water.

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Mix the dough until it becomes elastic and can be molded into a ball. Add more flour if it is too sticky.

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Wrap ball of dough in plastic and set in refrigerator for at least 30 minutes.

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To make the filling: Cut potatoes into cubes. Boil until soft.

As you can see…these russets were gigantic. I only used 1.5  potatoes for 1 pound.

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I used the orange sharp cheddar cheese because I can see that I’ve added enough cheese when the potatoes turn orange. The oranger the better.

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Mash with grated cheese, chives. Salt and pepper to taste. Let cool to room temperature.

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Test out the taste by eating about 10 spoonfuls. DO IT, so I don’t feel bad that I did it.

If you have any leftover filling, eat that too.

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To fill pierogies: Generously flour a cutting board and form the dough into a long roll. Add flour to the board and your hands as needed.

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Form 24 balls of dough from roll.

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Flatten a dough ball with your hand and make it large enough to place a heaping teaspoon (or more) or potato filling in center.

Try to make the filling into the shape of a ball if you can. It will give the pierogi a nice shape.

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Fold dumpling in half, and seal edges by crimping the sides together with a fork.

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Set on a floured surface and repeat until finished.

Pierogi dumplings are way more forgiving than Chinese potstickers. Since they’re filled with a starch rather than meat, after you boil them you won’t get enormous explosions from water being trapped inside the dumpling that cause splattering when they are sautéed. Don’t worry too much about any holes you can’t fix in the dumplings. I had a few holes but the filling wouldn’t escape even when I boiled them.

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Slice onions into long thin strips.

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Melt 1 Tbsp. of butter on a large skillet. Sauté onions until browned, set aside.

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To cook pierogies: Boil a large pot of salted water. On another burner, add 1 tsp. of butter on a skillet and heat on medium high heat. Add pierogies to the boiled water, 4-5 at a time but don’t overcrowd the pot. Boil for a few minutes until they float up, use a slotted spoon to lift them out onto a plate. Place drained pierogies onto the skillet and cook both sides until golden. Set on a plate and repeat process until finished. Top pierogies with sautéed onions and serve with sour cream.

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Enjoy! Have a nice weekend everyone.

26 Thoughts on “Potato and Cheese Pierogies

  1. Did i ever say that SoupBelly was my favorite site? I can not wait to make these… they look amazing! When will soupbelly be upgraded to allow us to taste all the great looking dishes you post about?

  2. Socki – I think you’re onto something here…Maybe I can make Soupbelly 3D and send everyone special glasses!

  3. That sounds great! If not full out tasting ability, then don’t forget to add at least a scratch and sniff.

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  5. Every time I come here, I drool…and then want to cook :)
    I have never heard of these, but I can tell I’d love them. Potato and cheese, in a dumpling? Delicious!

  6. Socki – I’ll look into it.

    Momisodes – You’ve never heard of pierogies?! If you want to try them beforehand, they are usually sold in the freezer section…I used to buy the Mrs. T’s brand. They have potato and cheese, potato and garlic, potato and onion, etc. Great for a carb craving :)

  7. YUM!!!!!!! I’m loving what you’re doing to your site. The process photos are fantastic.

  8. Monika on May 20, 2010 at 4:48 am said:

    As a polish girl, where these are a staple, it is such a pet peeve when people spell (or pronounce) them “perogy”. Even typing that was annoying…
    Pierogies doesn’t bother me as much, although in polish pierogi is the plural word, pierog singular. :)

    Anyway, they look yummy! Have you ever tried fruit pierogi? Delicious with sour cream and a little sugar!

  9. Thank you for this recipe! My husband is Polish, and I’ve been promising to make pierogies for a while now. I have a recipe that calls for farmer’s cheese, but I think I’ll try this version with cheddar first. Gorgeous photos :).

  10. Jennifer Trask on May 20, 2010 at 10:47 am said:

    I also like to sautee mushrooms with the onions to have with the pierogies. When I made my pierogies, I did have a lot of blow outs from leaving air inside. Mine were frozen first though. I wonder if there is a difference there.

  11. Jennifer – Interesting…I did freeze a batch but have yet to make them. I’ll be cautious about the blow-ups!

  12. My friend, who is of Polish background, told me to try it with Farmer’s Cheese too. I guess he thinks it’s better than Cheddar. I have yet to try that, but I’m sure either one will be great! Good luck!

  13. Monika – When I looked it up on wikipedia there were dozens of spellings for pierogi. I got so frustrated that I just used ‘pierogies’ the majority of the time since that’s how Americans say it. But yea, Pierogi as plural and Pierog as singular makes sense…

  14. Memoria – Thanks!

  15. Rachel on May 21, 2010 at 10:41 pm said:

    I made these tonight and they were amazing! Thanks for the delicious recipe :)

  16. Rachel – I’m glad you enjoyed them!

  17. Ooo…I love that – that’s one of my favourite dishes from polish cuisine :) Did you try pierogi with cottagge cheese?

  18. Pingback: Potato, Bacon & Cheese Pierogies « Pasta And Stuff

  19. As an ex-russian (from former Ukraine) i feel compelled to correct you all: these are not “pierogi”..these are either “vareniki” (if filled with potatoes, cheese or cabbage or cherries) or “pelmeni” (if filled with meat). Pierogi is a totally different dish: they are either baked or fried, not boiled. Its also a different dough. :)

  20. My husband is Polish and to him these are pierogi :) Depends alot on where you come from and how your family cooks…this is a DIVINE recipe thank you so much for posting it. Varneki (which I made the other night) is a dough that has cheese mixed into the dough, boiled and then cooked in onion and bacon… I’m eating these as I’m typing this… :)

  21. I make mine using farmers cheese… it has the same texture almost as a feta. It’s what my grandma from Poland used in hers— I also make a killer sauerkraut and mushroom one :)

  22. Pingback: Pierogies « hipnibbles

  23. Samantha on September 17, 2012 at 11:30 pm said:

    Instead of forming balls of dough, my Ukrainian grandmother used to roll out the dough to the preferred thickness, and cut out circles with a drinking glass. She also served them with sauteed onions and crispy crumbled bacon on top. Unfortunately she never wrote down her recipe. She used to make these for Christmas every year. Thank you for this wonderful recipe!

  24. Pingback: Potato and Cheddar Cheese Pierogies — Eat Laugh Purr

  25. sounds fantastic i cant wait to try it

  26. haha I just made these sunday……I only have ever used cream cheese ( a ton of it) in the mashed potatoes!!!!!! DELISH… I also “pinch” the dough together so there are no openings…..That is the biggest beating of making these…….to make sure they are pinched together sooooo good so that there is NO OPENINGS… otherwise potato soup!!!!!!

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