A blog about life, food and photography.

Chinese White Cut Chicken

Chinese White Cut Chicken

I don’t really know the exact translation for the name of this recipe, but in Cantonese it would be ‘white cut chicken’. I’ve also seen it on other sites  called ‘steeped chicken’, bái qie ji, or more commonly ‘Hainanese Chicken’, which is of Chinese origin but made in Malaysia and Thailand.

It’s so simple to make and tastes…..well, unadulterated. The flavor is completely natural and fresh tasting, and is as if you’ve never actually tasted chicken before this. I think it’s also easier than Roast Chicken, which is ridiculously easy too, but white cut chicken doesn’t need to be prepped or seasoned before cooking. You boil a large pot of water, then put the chicken in. It’s foolproof.

I also have a recipe below for the dipping sauce, which is a ginger/scallion mix.

White Cut Chicken

Ingredients:

  • 4 lb. chicken
  • large pot of water

Directions:

  1. Bring large pot of water to boil, then put chicken in. Wait until it comes to a boil again, then turn down to medium low and simmer for 20 minutes. Turn heat off and steep for another 20 minutes. Take chicken out of pot and place on plate to cool for 15 minutes and to let juices redistribute so it won’t be dry. Slice and serve warm or at room temperature.

_______________________________________________________________________

Ginger/Scallion Sauce

Ingredients:

  • 3 Tbsp. ginger, minced
  • 3 Tbsp. scallions (or chives), minced
  • 1 Tbsp. Sesame oil
  • 2 tsp. salt
  • 3 Tbsp. corn oil

Directions:

  1. Combine first 4 ingredients together in a heat safe dish. In a small pot, heat the corn oil on high heat for 2-3 minutes. Take the oil off the heat, then very carefully pour the oil onto the ginger/scallion mixture. It will sizzle, so be careful of any splattering.

_______________________________________________________________________

DSC_0206

Bring large pot of water to boil, then put chicken in. Wait until it comes to a boil again, then turn down to medium low and simmer for 20 minutes. Turn heat off and steep for another 20 minutes.

DSC_0222

Take chicken out of pot and place on plate to cool for 15 minutes and to let juices redistribute so it won’t be dry.

DSC_0221

If you’re not sure if the chicken is completely cooked, check to see if the juices run clear. The center of the bones may be red and that’s fine, and is due to the cooking method used.

DSC_0245

Slice and serve. See instructions for dipping sauce below.

DSC_0209

Mince ginger.

DSC_0210

You’re supposed to use scallions for the dipping sauce, but since I didn’t have any on hand I cut chives I had growing in the backyard.

DSC_0217

Sprinkle with salt.

DSC_0226

This is the brand of sesame oil I use. Combine first 4 ingredients together in a heat safe dish, because you will be pouring hot oil into it.

DSC_0227

In a small pot, heat the corn oil on high heat for 2-3 minutes.

DSC_0229

Take the oil off the heat, then very carefully pour the oil onto the ginger/scallion mixture.

DSC_0232

It will sizzle, so be careful of any splattering. I tried to get a picture of the bubbles of oil…

DSC_0236

Serve the dipping sauce with chicken warm or at room temp.

DSC_0247



7 thoughts on “Chinese White Cut Chicken”

  • I love this chicken. I have also gotten my husband to adore this chicken. My question is, I was always told to get a chicken from the chinese grocery store. You can not use a regular one. Is that true? If not, what kind do you use? Is it a fryer? a roaster? a hen?
    thanks! Puppydogs

  • Puppydogs – The chicken from a chinese grocery store would be ideal, since the texture is silkier than the standard grocery stores. But I used a standard fryer chicken from the American grocery store, and it came out great, better than I expected. The meat was melt in your mouth, tender and flavorful. I honestly couldn’t tell the difference between it and the chicken from the Chinese grocery stores, except MAYBE the taste was lacking slightly. That’s what the ginger/scallion sauce is for though 😛

  • Thank you for this recipe! I messed up trying to do it…I unfortunately have a lot of questions :(. I really appreciate your answers in advance! When I cooked the corn oil for 2 minutes, 1 minute in it started splattering everywhere so I put a lid on for another minute and it started smoking, burning my stainless steel lid – did this happen to you?

    Then when I slowly poured the hot corn oil on the ginger/scallion/salt, it made the salt spew everywhere :(. Did this happen to you so you had to add more salt back into the sauce?

    I waited 30 minutes for the chicken to boil but nothing happened so I held it down with a ladle for about another 20 minutes and it finally started boiling…did this happen for you? I have a gas stove if that matters. It just seemed to take too long for the chicken to get to a boiling point :*(

    Did your grocery store chicken come with a plastic packet of bone and giblet looking things inside of the chicken? I had no clue what to do with it so I threw it away…probably a dumb thing to do.

    Thank you very much in advance and as always, thank you for posting delicious recipes on your blog with funny stories as well!

  • Robin – I heated my oil in a small pot on high heat (I have a gas stove also) and there was no splattering. Are you sure there wasn’t any water in the pot when you poured the oil in? That would’ve caused splattering. Maybe just heat it for 30 seconds – 1 minute next time and see what happens.

    My ginger/scallion/salt sizzled when I poured the oil in, but it didn’t splatter, though I saw that with other blogs it sizzled so bad it did splatter sometimes, so they did the process in the kitchen sink. Maybe you can mix the salt into the ginger/scallions so the salt won’t spew anymore. You could try spooning the oil into the mixture a little at a time instead of pouring it in too.

    Did you wait until the water was boiling before placing the chicken inside the pot? My chicken came to a boil after about a minute when I did this.

    I always throw out the giblets because I don’t use them for anything, haha. Don’t worry about it.

    Good luck and hope I answered your questions!

  • I appreciate you getting back to me! I will definitely try the other methods you mentioned.

    I hope you and yours have a healthy, happy and prosperous New Year 😀

  • Oops, don’t mean to spam your blog but I forgot to answer your questions. The pot was dry so I don’t know what caused the smoking and burning of the lid, lol.

    I did wait until the water was boiling before putting the chicken in the pot so I’m not sure why it took almost hour to start boiling again 🙁 Maybe I got a “lemon” of a chicken, haha. Thank you again for your help. Take care!

  • In Cantonese it’s called literally “White cut chicken” but guess you can also call it “Poached chicken” for your non-Chinese friends as you put the whole chicken into the boiling water and leave it there covered for awhile to cook with the fire turned to very low and off.

    Growing up just outside NYC’s Chinatown, my mother would make this about 1 -2 times per month. Afterwards the used cooking liquid would be used for soup. But she would only use “Buddhist style hens, (with legs & feet intact ) from the Chinese butchers / markets or the live poultry market.

    My favorite way to eat this type of chicken is to dip the cut up pieces into some oyster sauce also after dipping it into the scallions & ginger oil and to have it with white rice. It’s called Hainan chicken when it is served with the red chillis and garlic based type liquid sauce and a popular Chinese dish in Singapore & Malaysia from the travel shows.

    Poached chicken can also be served cold, usually presented with some fresh long thinly sliced green onions/scallions and fresh Chinese cilantro/coriander.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *