A blog about life, food and photography.

Korean Fried Chicken Sandwich

Korean Fried Chicken Sandwich

When I couldn’t decide between Korean fried chicken wings or a Chick-Fil-A burger, this Frankenstein monstrosity was spawned from the depths of my mind. Which is actually my stomach.

I make these sweet Korean fried chicken wings on a monthly basis. When my arteries don’t feel like they are clogged enough and I need to replenish the clogging artery material, I find creative ways to deep fry more things to stuff into my face. Instead of frying wings I use chicken thighs, and I also make the same sweet and spicy sauce to drizzle over them.

Sadly, nobody in our household shares this weird obsession with deep frying and stuffing said fry things in face. So I usually have to take one (or two or five) for the team and eat all of my test recipes. It’s a hard job but someone’s gotta do it. My husband also has to watch his cholesterol (I think that’s what it’s called? That artery clogging stuff? Chol-est-er-ol.) I kid I kid. He has to watch his cholesterol because when the doctor told him he’s at risk, he goes cold turkey on anything unhealthy. As if he can get his cholesterol levels to 0 or something. Pssshhh. Bacon? Not even a slice. Red meat? He’ll have a cucumber sandwich instead. Chicken thighs? No, he’ll have chicken breast with no skin. Butter? No thanks, he’ll have Smart Balance buttery spread. It is my worst nightmare. Not his cholesterol problems (that’s HIS worst nightmare) but the fact that I can’t cook for someone who suddenly flips a 180 and turned health nut overnight. I have to learn how to cook for him again since everything I make, he looks as if I’m trying to poison him.

korean fried chicken sandwiches 3

Speaking of poison, no I’m just kidding. But if you don’t have cholesterol problems or don’t care to find out if you do here is my Korean fried chicken sandwich. It is shallow fried in a skillet. Since there is no need to render out the fat because there is no skin on the chicken thighs, we don’t need to use the double fry technique that I use for my chicken wings in this post. Double frying ensures that the fat is rendered out of the skin, ensuring a thinner, crispier shell without the need for thick breading.

Normally there are three methods of frying (not counting new trends such as air-frying, etc.): pan frying, shallow frying and deep frying. I always use the term deep frying when talking about fried foods, and while you can deep fry this, I prefer to use the shallow frying method because it doesn’t require as much oil. Just be sure to fill the oil halfway up the thickness of the chicken, then flip the chicken over halfway throughout the cooking time and you’re set.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Instructions with photos:

DSC_7004

Salt 4 chicken thighs (deboned, no skin) generously. If you have black pepper, powdered garlic and onion, you can sprinkle it on as well. It gives the chicken a little more flavor it (you) didn’t know it needed.

DSC_7022

In a large bowl, combine 1/2 cup flour with 1/2 cup potato starch. If you don’t have potato starch, you can use cornstarch instead.

DSC_7046

Dredge the chicken in the flour mixture, pressing it into all the nooks and crannies to ensure the entire area is covered well.

DSC_7053

In a large skillet, add enough oil to cover halfway up the thickness of the chicken and heat to medium high heat. To test if the oil is ready, sprinkle a bit of flour, if it rises up and bubbles it’s ready. Gently place the chicken thighs into the oil and cook for 6-8 minutes,

DSC_7057

then flip the chicken over and fry another 6-8 minutes or until chicken is no longer pink in the center.

DSC_7077

The chicken should be golden brown and crunchy on the outside when done. Place on top of a cookie rack over a sheet pan to help it retain it’s crispiness as it cools.

DSC_7029

During the same time the chicken is cooking, combine water, ginger, soy sauce, brown sugar and vinegar in a small saucepan.

DSC_7022new

Here’s a handy tip before I forget: use a spoon to scrape off the skin on ginger. A knife takes away more ginger than you want it to, while the spoon is gentle yet effective.

Gentle yet effective…sounds like a commercial for ex-lax.

Hungry yet??

DSC_7036

Bring to a boil, then add the corn syrup and turn down to a simmer for 10 minutes or until it’s a thickness that clings to a spoon. Mine took between 12-15 minutes.

DSC_7039

This is the consistency the sauce should be.

DSC_7081

Add sesame seeds and red pepper flakes. These are both optional, but I like the look of the sesame seeds, and the heat of the pepper flakes, so I add a little more than my recipe calls for.

DSC_7085

Drizzle the sauce over the chicken on both sides.

korean fried chicken sandwiches 2

Serve on a toasted bun topped with Japanese soy vinegar pickles.

korean fried chicken sandwiches 1

Here’s another photo for your enjoyment.

kfcsandwichpin

Korean Fried Chicken Sandwich

August 17, 2017
: 4
: Easy to Moderate

By:

Ingredients
  • 4 chicken thighs, deboned and no skin
  • salt
  • pepper
  • powdered onion
  • powdered garlic
  • 4 buns
  • pickled cucumbers
  • Sauce Ingredients:
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 cup sliced ginger
  • 1 Tbsp. soy sauce
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 2 Tbsp. vinegar
  • 1/2 cup corn syrup
  • 1/2 Tbsp. sesame seeds
  • 1 tsp. tsp. dried red pepper flakes (more or less to your preference)
Directions
  • Step 1 Salt 4 chicken thighs (deboned, no skin) generously. If you have black pepper, powdered garlic and onion, you can sprinkle it on as well.
  • Step 2 In a large bowl, combine 1/2 cup flour with 1/2 cup potato starch (substitution: cornstarch).
  • Step 3 Dredge the chicken in the flour mixture, pressing it into all the nooks and crannies to ensure the entire area is covered well.
  • Step 4 In a large skillet, add enough oil to cover halfway up the thickness of the chicken and heat to medium high heat. To test if the oil is ready, sprinkle a bit of flour, if it rises up and bubbles it’s ready. Gently place the chicken thighs into the oil and cook for 6-8 minutes, then flip the chicken over and fry another 6-8 minutes or until chicken is no longer pink in the center.
  • Step 5 The chicken should be golden brown and crunchy on the outside when done. Place on top of a cookie rack over a sheet pan to help it retain it’s crispiness as it cools.
  • Step 6 During the same time the chicken is cooking, combine water, ginger, soy sauce, brown sugar and vinegar in a small saucepan.
  • Step 7 Bring to a boil, then add the corn syrup and turn down to a simmer for 10 minutes or until it’s a thickness that clings to a spoon (Optional – add sesame seeds and red pepper flakes per your preference)
  • Step 8 Drizzle the sauce over the chicken on both sides. Serve on a toasted bun topped with Japanese soy vinegar pickles.


2 thoughts on “Korean Fried Chicken Sandwich”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *