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Spam Musubi

Spam Musubi

I needed an excuse to eat spam (don’t we all?) so I decided to make spam musubi. Since we don’t live in Hawaii and can’t go to the local convenience store there to pick up a giant slab of rice with a giant slab of spam on top all wrapped in seaweed, I have to make mine at home.

It isn’t the fanciest meal, but it does its job when all you want are carbs and….spam.

You can sandwich the spam in between two layers of rice, or if that is too much rice, just use one layer of rice. It all depends on your preference, as I’ve seen people make them in all different shapes and sizes. You can also slice the spam thinner (10 slices), but since I’m already using low sodium spam, I like them to be thicker (8 slices), and thicker won’t mean saltier. Hell, you can even roll them like sushi rolls if you’d like so they are more bite sized for easy-mouth-popping-in.

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I don’t understand the people who don’t like spam. It is so foreign to me. Spam, Vienna sausages, hot dogs, bologna, I love all fatty, salty, ultra processed meats. We all die someday, why not enjoy the time we have on earth…with some spam?

But carcinogens! And sodium! And fat! It’s 2017, aren’t we all supposed to be on some whole 30 or whole food or clean eating diet already, you wonder?

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What I believe is…it’s 2017, and we are free to eat whatever we want. I enjoy eating everything. I don’t eat veggies because they’re healthy, I eat them because I enjoy them. I eat spam because I like it. I eat fried chicken because well do I really need to explain it?

I’m not going to eat an entire can’s worth of spam in one sitting, though. That’s just wrong (for me personally – I don’t tell you how to live your life). And I also eat really balanced, as we buy tons of veggies and fruit (more than meat most of the time here, although my husband would prefer more). I also ran for 32 minutes this morning before eating my spam. So, moderation, balance, etcetera etcetera. This is how I justify eating whatever I want.

Less ranting, more spam!

Spam Musubi

November 10, 2017
: makes 8 spam musubi
: easy

By:

Ingredients
  • 1 can of low sodium spam
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 2 tbsp. sugar
  • 2 cups uncooked medium grain rice, cooked
  • seaweed sheets, cut into strips for wrapping musubi
  • furikake seasoning
  • spam can, washed and dried
  • plastic wrap
Directions
  • Step 1 Cook the rice per instructions on the package. After it is cooked, set aside covered for ten minutes before using.
  • Step 2 Cut seaweed sheets into strips with a pair of scissors, 3-4 strips per sheet. Set aside. In a small bowl, combine the soy sauce and sugar, and mix until sugar is dissolved. Set aside.
  • Step 3 In a large skillet, cook a single layer of spam slices on medium heat, until both sides are browned (2-3 minutes). Pour the soy sauce mixture and coat both sides. Cook for another 2-3 minutes, then place spam on plate.
  • Step 4 Line the inside of the spam can with plastic wrap. Place a golf ball sized amount of rice in the bottom of the can, and press firmly to create a even layer. Sprinkle furikake on rice, then place one slice of spam on top, followed by another layer of rice. Press everything down, then carefully lift the plastic wrap out of the can in order to pull the musubi out of the can. Place musubi on a cutting board, over a strip of seaweed. Wrap seaweed around the musubi, and seal shut with a dab of water. Repeat the process until all the musubi has been made.
  • Step 5 If you aren’t eating all the spam musubi in one sitting, wrap them in plastic to eat later in the day. If you need to store it longer, keep them in fridge, then reheat in microwave for 30 seconds or until warm. But be warned, when not eating fresh the rice will be a bit stale and seaweed a bit chewy.

 

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Instructions with Photos:

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This is the brand of rice I use. We normally eat long grain rice with our dishes, but use medium grain for making sushi, kimbap, or musubi. Since the proportion of water to rice differs between medium and long grain rice, please read the instructions on the package on how to cook the rice.

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I recommend using scissors to cut the strips of seaweed, as it is sometimes difficult to cut with a knife.

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Cook the rice per instructions on the package. After it is cooked, set aside covered for ten minutes before using.

In a small bowl, combine the soy sauce and sugar, and mix until sugar is dissolved. Set aside.

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Cut seaweed sheets into strips with a pair of scissors, 3-4 strips per sheet. Set aside.

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In a large skillet, cook a single layer of spam slices on medium heat, until both sides are browned (2-3 minutes).

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Pour the soy sauce mixture and coat both sides. Cook for another 2-3 minutes,

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then place spam on plate.

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Line the inside of the spam can with plastic wrap. Place a golf ball sized amount of rice in the bottom of the can, and press firmly to create a even layer. Sprinkle furikake on rice, then place one slice of spam on top, followed by another layer of rice. Press everything down, then carefully lift the plastic wrap out of the can in order to pull the musubi out of the can.

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Place musubi on a cutting board, over a strip of seaweed. Wrap seaweed around the musubi, and seal shut with a dab of water. Repeat the process until all the musubi has been made.

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This is me testing out different ways to make the musubi. You can simply use the can as a cookie cutter and form the rice that way, but I couldn’t pack my rice enough so it wouldn’t fall apart later.

The plastic lined spam can has been the best way I could effectively make it without the rice falling apart.

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If you aren’t eating all the spam musubi in one sitting, wrap them in plastic to eat later in the day. If you need to store it longer, keep them in fridge, then reheat in microwave for 30 seconds or until warm. But be warned, when not eating fresh, the rice will be a bit stale and seaweed a bit chewy.



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