Category Archives: Pasta

Wat Dan Hor (Rice Noodles with Egg Sauce)

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So, what’s the difference between Ho Fun (Haw Fun) and Wat Dan Hor? The eggs (wat dan) are mixed into the gravy. I’ve actually never had Wat Dan Hor until I moved to Cali, since my favorite dish is just plain Sup Chow Beef Ho Fun (though there’s nothing plain about that, either). Sup Chow Ho Fun is wide rice noodles stir fried and covered with a rich gravy, veggies and beef. This dish is usually served at lunch, or in combination with dim sum, and comes in variations of ‘wet’ (with gravy) or ‘dry’ (without gravy), and topped with either beef, chicken (ok, chicken might be a bit Americanized), pork, or seafood. I always preferred the ‘wet’ variety with lots of gravy, beef and veggies. That’s what happens when you grow up in a household where your dad requests everything with extra gravy or sauce on it.

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I rarely made any sort of rice noodle dish in Rochester because by the time fresh noodles like that were shipped to the Asian markets, they were stale….frozen…or just old. I found mold on it once after I brought it home. I didn’t like dealing with them. Now that 99 Ranch is my best friend (one of the biggest Chinese supermarkets I’ve ever shopped at) I can get fresh rice noodles any time I want, along with fresh and CHEAP seafood, meat and veggies.

The version I’m making is Seafood Wat Dan Hor, with lots of shrimp and gai lan. One major thing I did different than the restaurants is thin out the gai lan stalks so they were easier to chew. I absolutely can’t stand trying to chew apart a huge gai lan stalk at a restaurant, pulling it apart with my teeth in front of everyone, and desperately trying to hold it with a pair of chopsticks without having it slip back down to my plate. Sometimes I get so frustrated I want to ask the waiter for a fork.

It’s happened to you before, I know it.

Wat Dan Hor (Rice Noodles with Egg Gravy)

printable recipe / Serves 4-6

Ingredients:

  • 2 lbs. rice noodles
  • 4 tsp. soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp. oil for stir frying
  • 1 lb. gai lan, or other veggies, washed
  • 12-16 medium shrimp, thawed and deveined, sprinkled with salt and pepper

Ingredients for Gravy:

  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 1 1/2 tsp. oyster flavored sauce
  • 1 tsp. soy sauce
  • 1/2 tsp. sugar
  • 1/4 tsp. sesame oil
  • 1/2 tsp. minced garlic
  • 2 eggs

*Combine the first 6 gravy ingredients in a bowl or measuring cup and have ready before stir frying

Thickening Agent for Gravy:

  • 1 Tbsp. cornstarch mixed with a bit of cold water or chicken broth, until soupy

Directions:

1) Pull apart the rice noodles, or slice the chunk of rice noodle into desired width. Separate noodles as much as possible so it will be easier to stir fry.

2) Heat one tablespoon of oil in a wok on medium high heat. Add noodles, stir fry until they begin to soften and separate a bit. Add soy sauce, stir fry until noodles separate fully, and surface of noodles begin to brown, or even burn (this will add that delicious ‘wok hay’ taste). Set noodles aside in large dish.

2.5) If you want to opt out the shrimp and use meat, add 1 tsp. oil into wok and stir fry  4-6 oz. thinly cut chicken or beef until cooked. Set aside, then add back into gravy after it is thickened (between steps 3 and 4).

3) Turn the wok up to high, pour in the first 6 ingredients for gravy. Let come to a boil, then simmer on medium for 3-4 minutes.  Add in vegetables and cook until soft but crisp (gai lan took about 3-4 minutes). Add shrimp; once they start turning orange, slowly spoon in cornstarch mixture until gravy is thick enough to coat a spoon.

4) Turn heat off, crack two eggs into gravy. Stir until cooked and gravy has turned white. Pour gravy onto the rice noodles, serve while hot.

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I thinned out the gai lan stalks and had them ready as individual leaves. No more tearing with teeth at the dinner (or lunch) table.

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Have the thickening agent prepared beforehand. I combined the cornstarch with a bit of chicken broth (didn’t want to dilute the gravy with an ounce of water, not one bit) until it was soupy enough to pour later on. The cornstarch and liquid will keep separating, so stir it once in awhile as you’re preparing/cooking the dish.

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The rice noodles I bought at 99 ranch come pre-cut into a width thinner than what I would’ve preferred. I’ve noticed in most of the Cali restaurants, Ho Fun is thinner than on the East Coast. So, when in Rome…er…San Diego. You know what I mean.

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Combine the first 6 ingredients of the gravy beforehand. Trust me…all this extra preparation will pay off later, and you won’t be scrounging around your kitchen looking for ingredients as your noodles will burn.

I would know.

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Pull apart the rice noodles, or slice the chunk of rice noodle into desired width. Separate noodles as much as possible so it will be easier to stir fry. Rice noodles stick together a lot, so you won’t be able to pull them apart that much. The heat from the stir-frying will separate them.

Heat one tablespoon of oil in a wok on medium high heat. Add noodles, stir fry until they begin to soften and separate a bit. Add soy sauce, stir fry until noodles separate fully, and surface of noodles begin to brown, or even burn (this will add that delicious ‘wok hay’ taste). Set noodles aside in large dish.

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Turn the wok up to high, pour in the first 6 ingredients for gravy. Let come to a boil, then simmer on medium for 3-4 minutes. 

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Add in vegetables and cook until soft but crisp (gai lan took about 3-4 minutes). Add shrimp.

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Once shrimp start turning orange, slowly spoon in cornstarch mixture until gravy is thick enough to coat a spoon.

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Turn heat off, crack two eggs into gravy. Stir until cooked and gravy has turned white.

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Pour gravy onto the rice noodles, serve while hot.

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This dish was easier than I thought. I actually made it taste as good as something I would order at a restaurant, if not better. The dish overall had enough flavor, something I never was able to do successfully (in my opinion). It wasn’t watered down tasting. Of course I added way more shrimp than most places would consider to add, since most places would skimp on the pricier ingredients. And of course cutting the gai lan made it more enjoyable.

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Next time I will definitely try making regular Beef Ho Fun. It will be interesting to see which one you guys like more. As for me, it’s sort of a tie right now.

Have a great weekend everyone!!

Pasta with Smoked Turkey Sausage and Onions.

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Throughout the day yesterday, my husband asked me THREE TIMES if I was still planning on making pasta with sausage. You would think that I starved him or something. And I kept reassuring him there would be pasta and sausage and onions when he got home. Maybe he just needed to hear it. 

It’s pretty simple actually. I’m almost embarrassed to write a recipe since pretty much everyone makes this in their own special way. 

Pasta with Smoked Turkey Sausage and Onions (serves 4) 

printable recipe 

Ingredients: 

  • 1 medium white onion, sliced
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1 package Hillshire Farm Turkey Smoked Sausage, sliced
  • 1 Tbsp. butter
  • 1 1/2 tsp. garlic, minced
  • 1 29 oz. can tomato sauce
  • Hot sauce (optional)
  • cooked pasta

Directions: 

1) In a large pot, melt butter on medium high. Add garlic, sauté for about 30-45 seconds. Add onion with a 1/2 tsp. salt, sauté until translucent. Add sausage, sauté until onions and sausage start getting brown. Pour in sauce to combine. Add hot sauce to taste. Turn heat down between medium – medium low, cover with lid and cook for 15 minutes. Serve over pasta. 

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I love Hillshire Farm Smoked Sausage. Even the turkey sausage because it doesn’t taste all greasy and I can eat more of it. Hehe… 

Ever since I moved across the country, all the brands are different from what I’m use to. But at least they still have this. 

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You can slice the onions the way you prefer to. I like to leave them as rings. 

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This was the first tomato sauce I found that wasn’t too acidic for my wretched acid reflux. I didn’t have to add sugar. 

Tip: Add 1 tsp. sugar to a jar of sauce to reduce it’s acidity. 

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I spent 20 minutes crushing and mincing garlic one afternoon to store in a jar. I then filled the jar with olive oil. So my hands only reeked of garlic for one day and not every time I need garlic in a dish. 

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In a large pot, melt butter on medium high. Add garlic, sauté for about 30-45 seconds. Add onion with a 1/2 tsp. salt, sauté until translucent. Add sausage, sauté until onions and sausage start getting brown. Pour in sauce to combine. 

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Add hot sauce to taste. This is optional. I like to put a lot of hot sauce on my own dish of pasta… 

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Turn heat down between medium – medium low, cover with lid and cook for 15 minutes.  

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  Serve over pasta.

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