This is why we’re fat.

garbageplate

This website is like walking through a food freak show.  Check it out.  I can’t seem to look away.  At first I thought it was sorta like a website contest of who can create the most disgusting looking meals and post pictures, but then I stumbled onto this hometown favorite from Rochester, NY.  This is called a garbage plate.  And it’s pretty sad when people hear of your town because of this monstrosity.  We’re famous for a plate of garbage.  I admit I have ordered these many late nights after drinking, as the grease seems to calm a stomach full of alcohol. I actually finished a whole plate once by myself, only to see it make a surprise encore appearance 30 minutes later as I puked it all up.  I guess too much grease is a bad thing.

Oh, in case you were interested to know what a garbage plate is constructed with, it’s two hamburger patties on top of a combo. of mac salad and home fries, covered with cheese, mustard horseradish sauce, and a spicy chili meat sauce.

Shrimp and Pork Won Tons

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These won tons aren’t the sad looking ones you order at chinese take-out restaurants, with a measily bead of mystery meat inside a thick doughy casing.  The sweetness of the shrimp is combined with the sweetness of the pork to make an ubersweet tasty filling.  My mother and I usually prepared large batches (75-100), and freezing the ones we didn’t eat, since they freeze fairly well.  The won ton wrappers can be found in any asian market.  They are the square wrappers, not the circular ones.  I don’t remember exactly why I had to specify that, except that I’ve been asked a few times what won ton wrappers look like.  One clue is that it says ‘Won Ton Wrappers’ on the packaging.  After making these since I was 8 years old, I developed the uncanny ability to sniff the meat filling to determine if it needs more salt, sesame oil, soy sauce, etc.  And I also developed a complex from the result of 2 generations of chinese mothers exclaiming my technique in wrapping won tons isn’t perfected like theirs, and how I am too slow in the kitchen, as they are won-ton-making-machines at a quick pace of 5-7 won tons per minute.  This recipe is my mom’s recipe, but no matter how well you think you made these, they are NOT as good as hers…

This recipe makes 50 won tons (2 won ton wrapper packages).

Ingredients:

  • 1/3 lb. raw, deveined shrimp
  • 1/3 lb. ground pork
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tsp. ground ginger root
  • 1 Tbsp. soy sauce
  • 1 tsp. sesame oil
  • 1 Tbsp. cornstarch
  • 2 Tbsp. chopped green onions
  • 1 Tbsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp. pepper
  • 2 packages of won ton wrappers
  • Chicken broth, optional for soup (8 oz. per serving / 64 oz. if you are cooking all 50 won tons that day)

Directions:

1) Coarsely chop shrimp. In a food processor (yes, even my mom uses a food processor now), combine all ingredients except the last 2 on the list.  Place mixture in bowl.

2) How to wrap a won ton.  This part gets a little tricky. Usually the wrapper packaging has illustrated instructions, so follow those.  Or if those are totally not understandable, place small spoonful of filling one corner, roll the filled corner until a perfect triangle of wrapper remains, pinch the 2 rolled ends together, seal with water.  It should look like a nurses’ cap, with a little triangular flap in the back.  This is a picture of what the front should look like:

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3) Place in boiling pot of water for 5-7 minutes, drain.  To make won ton soup, boil chicken broth separately. Combine broth and won tons in serving bowls. Garnish with chopped green onions.

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